Blog

  • Sustainable tourism - Leave No Trace

    Sustainability is the key to a positive future for tourism

    Embedding sustainable practices into all aspects of a tourism business has become more common these days.  It is widely understood that sustainability is key to minimise the negative impacts (such as over tourism, exploitation of children and wild animals, inauthentic tourism activities and poorly paid seasonal jobs) and maximise the positive impacts (such as promoting cultural heritage, job creation for economic independence, protection of wildlife species and habitats, job creation, community-led tourism).

  • A digital world

    Digital Transformation in the Tourism Sector

    Digitalisation has transformed the way companies do business.  In the tourism industry, purchasing flights online and booking hotel rooms on the Internet marked the early days of digital transformation in the sector.  

  • Caribbean island, blue tourism

    Three unique challenges to sustainable tourism in islands

    Blue tourism is a term used to describe Coastal and Maritime tourism. The sector has become an increasing source of income for destinations with attractive coastlines thanks to the development of multiple tourism activities such as cruise tourism, boating, watersports, scuba diving, marine life observation, fishing and recreational use of beaches. However, these activities often put a lot of pressure on local ecosystems and tend to damage the destinations’ environmental assets, which, very often are what visitors are attracted to in the destination. Sustainable development of these blue tourism destinations is therefore becoming critical to avoid altering their natural resources to a point of no return. 

  • Resident Visitor Survey for destination sustainable development.

    The one stakeholder NOT to forget…!

    Sustainable tourism encompasses much more than solely protecting the environment in the destination, even though that is essential of course. A sustainable destination must be one that cares for its wildlife and landscapes, but also one that cares for its inhabitants! When thinking about tourism, one often thinks about visitors and the private tourism sector within the destination. But sometimes we forget the most important stakeholder: the local community, which is not always directly linked to the tourism sector.

  • Digital Nomad and Bleisure

    Millennials and Gen Z Poised to Spearhead a Rise in Bleisure Travel after COVID-19

    Before COVID-19, the ‘bleisure’ travel trend, defined as a mix of business and leisure travel, was taking off, driven by the Millennials (or Gen Y), a large, important travelling group.  Already keen travellers, Millennials are well known to be keen on experiential travel that offers an authentic insight into a destination, immersing themselves into new cultures and local lives. 

  • Street food cart

    How Food Tourism is a Driver for Authentic Tourism Experiences

    As food plays a central part in the lives of all people on the planet and local specialities are widely appreciated as an intrinsic feature of many cultures, it is now well understood that local cuisines play an important role in offering the visitor an authentic insight into the culture of a place.